Challenge. Accepted.

Quote

“Nothing worth anything in life is ever easy”

This is something that I often say to people, and it defines the very principle by which I live my life. Life is the most worthwhile thing in the world, and is therefore the most difficult.

As I have posted about recently in my article about New Year’s Resolutions, I have suffered many personal issues this past year that have really pushed me from my path of becoming a professional journalist and photographer. Because, life is not easy.

Barney Stinson quote, How I Met Your Mother

“When I get sad, I stop being sad and be awesome instead. True story” – Barney Stinson, How I Met Your Mother

I have made it very clear to myself, my friends, my family, and my readers, that this year I have every intention of finding a balance between my personal and professional life, and earning money from my photography and journalism.

It is not going to be easy, at times it will be darned hard, but it is going to be really worthwhile. So, as Barney Stinson of the How I Met Your Mother television series has said many, many times…

“Challenge Accepted!”

I am breaking down my target into short-term, more achievable goals

  • Advertise my services
  • Gain 200 Likes on my FaceBook Page
  • Update website to have price list, references, etc, to encourage potential paid work
  • Send selection of works from photography and journalistic Portfolios to magazines and newspapers for consideration of publication
  • Brainstorm ideas and write enough “short and sweet” articles to set up the Blog to publish one every week for two months. This will develop my ability to write shorter articles and within a time limit.
  • Type up the interviews from Euro Gamer Expo 2012 and publish them
  • etc, etc, etc – more targets on the way soon!

I shall be posting updates on my progress, which you can follow in my Personal Progress Blog category, Subscribe to my updates with the ‘Stay Informed’ button on my starting page, ‘Follow’ me on my Twitter, or ‘Like’ my Fan Page on FaceBook.

If you have any comments or suggestions to help my in my task, I encourage you to Comment or Message me.

Image credit: Offset-Zero of deviantART

New Year, Fresh Start

Introduction
Irony can be quite harsh! I initially wrote this article at the very start of the new year, but, thanks to a huge influx of personal problems, I am only now posting it, which is precisely what the topic is about: my New Year’s Resolution to balance my personal life and my professional efforts.

So, it would appear that thus far, I am not succeeding very well in my task, but, here is my article, finished, and published. A start, though a delayed one, is better than no start at all.

Thank you all for your patience.

Article

NEW YEAR, FRESH START
a history lesson and a fresh perspective on new year’s resolutions

– – – –

When I initially started this Blog in March 2012, I had made a decision to pursue my dream of becoming a professional journalist and photographer. I was determined that my move to Margate, a fresh start in and of itself, would be the push in the right direction that I needed. A new place, new people and plenty to write about and photograph.

Whilst those first few months were relatively productive, I found that my personal life was holding me back. My suffering poor health and having family and friends in turmoil, my writing and photography was taken almost to an utter halt, made a secondary priority, essentially, to life. But, the longer I went without posting, the more I realised how much I truly missed it, how much I truly needed it.

– – – –

Having thought long and hard about this dilemma, of the “pros and cons” of attempting to balance journalism and photography with a stress-filled personal life and poor health, I have now, ironically in the month of January which is considered worldwide as the beginning of a new year and a fresh start, decided that it is of the utmost importance that I return to my passions, to start anew what I began last year.

So, with the timing of my fresh start falling on the New Year, you would not be mistaken if you considered it to be a form of New Year’s Resolution, one that aims for me to have a healthy balance between my personal and professional lives, and begins with me spending days of researching facts and figures on the history of this worldwide tradition to inspire me, and my readers, to embrace it..

– – – –

New Year is a tradition dating back hundreds, if not thousands of years which originates from dozens of cultures and historical civilisations. It is believed that it was Julius Caesar of the Roman Empire who first suggested that the year begin on January 1st, in honour of the Roman God Janus, after which the month was named. This was all the way back in 46 BC, but it was not until 1752 AD that the Britons adopted the Gregorian Calendar, with its twelve month cycle ending in December and beginning in January. Prior to this, we actually celebrated our New Year as “Lady Day”, believed to be the day when Mary, Jesus’ mother, was informed of her son’s coming birth, on March 25th.

The tradition of New Year’s Resolutions can also be traced back just as far, if not further, although what was considered the start of each year was different. The ancient Babylonians and the Romans began their calendar year by making promises to their Gods, and the Knights of the Mediaeval era took “The Peacock Vow” at the end of Christmas each year to re-affirm their commitment to their code of chivalry, to name but a few examples. It is unknown as to when or how the modern, international tradition of New Year’s Resolutions came to happen, however.

– – – –

Interestingly enough, New Year’s Day is quite possibly the only global Public Holiday, even though many countries have their own unique calendars for their national faith or heritage. This fact literally brings the world together, breaking down all boundaries of skin colour, sex, country of residence, religion, or culture, and that is a truly beautiful thing.

So, why is it that the majority of people fail to succeed in the goal that they set upon themselves? In recent surveys it has been discovered that eighty-eight percent of UK residents that were questioned had failed in their prior year’s goal. Surveyed Americans fared even worse. With these negative statistics, many people would not be blamed for taking a “why bother?” stance on the concept. I, however, prefer to have a “glass half full” perspective.

– – – –

These same studies show that, though many failed, there were very valid reasons as to why. They set themselves unrealistic, almost unachievable goals, or far too broad ones. “Lose weight”, “get fit”, “get a job”, these are all achievable, but more difficult to reach because of the lack of specifics or their long term nature. One is far more likely to succeed in one’s goal by setting smaller, more realistic tasks, or step-by-step lifestyle changes to achieve it, such as losing a certain amount of weight each month, or changing ones diet. This should, in theory, create a regular, positive feeling of achievement in the person, compared to the dragging negativity that results from many months of supposed failure.

Further examination of studies into New Year’s Resolutions shows us that there are also distinct differences between how each sex succeeds in their tasks. Men are more successful when they broke down their resolution into smaller, more achievable goals, whereas women found more success when they made their goals public and drew on the support of friends and family.

– – – –

I have decided, for my New Year’s Resolution to succeed, it needs to combine everything that I have learned. My resolution must be clear and concise, broken down over the year into smaller, more achievable goals, and shared with my friends and family so that I can gander support and advice throughout my efforts.

So, my overall resolution for the year, though originally something such as “pursue journalism professionally” or “Blog more”, has moulded itself into “earn money from my journalism and photography”, through smaller weekly or monthly goals such as “reach 200 Likes on my FaceBook Page” and “send Portfolio to magazines to consider for publication”, the progress for which I will be sharing through social networking.

– – – –

The facts and theories are sound. Whether, however, they work in practice, remains to be seen. Perhaps, this time next year, I shall be writing a follow-up article of my personal experiences and conclusions on the topic. Only time shall tell…

In the meanwhile, I leave you all with my findings, and hopefully, the inspiration to take them in your own stride and embrace this new perspective on a very old tradition. Will you, as I have, set yourself a New Year’s Resolution this year, and try to see it through? Comment and discuss…

Further Reading
The Mental Health Foundation’s guide to New Year’s Resolutions
Wiki-How’s guide to succeeding in New Year’s Resolutions
US New Year’s Resolutions statistics, updated in December of 2012
An interesting article on the history of New Year’s Resolutions
The History Channel’s history of New Year’s Resolutions

Feedback
It is important that I receive feedback from my readers. I would truly appreciate any feedback at all that you can provide me. Posting comments of encouragement, or constructively critiquing my efforts. I really want to further myself as a writer and with your help I can.

Thank you.

Writers On Writing

Quote

posted a Blog with quotes and facts regarding many published writers’ setbacks before publication. I have had such positive feedback and so many views for the aforementioned post that I have decided to expand upon the theme.

Today I am posting quotes from writers with regards to their art. I hope that you enjoy reading them and that they make you smile and they inspire you as much as they did me.

FICTION

“I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.”
– Douglas Adams

“You don’t become a writer because you want to. You become a writer because you have to. Because – and I court double nagatives here – you cannot not become a writer. It’s the only way to quell, however temporarily, the voices in your head that demand you become their vessel.”

– Peter David

JOURNALISM

“And I believe that good journalism, good television, can make our world a better place.”
– Christiane Amanpour

“I still believe that if your aim is to change the world, journalism is a more immediate short-term weapon.”
– Tom Stoppard

GENERAL

“Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
Never use a long word where a short one will do.
If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
Never use the passive where you can use the active.
Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English
equivalent.
Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.”

– George Orwell

Nothing in life worth anything is easy, and writing is priceless, to both word smith and reader.

Keep on writing, and perhaps someday something you say will be written down and quoted to writers in the years to come…

Further Reading
More examples of quotes from various writers about their art can be found on this website and this website.
The Peter David quote was taken from his published work, Writing For Comics With Peter David

Lots of big changes

So, it has been a month since my last update, and though I apologise for this drought in my Blog Entries, I have good reason – I have been very busy!

First and foremost, I now have a website. Do please visit it here where you can browse my Photograph Portfolio, read about my work, and even book me (currently no charge) for a shoot or an event.

Secondly, I have been planning my trip to this year’s Euro Gamer Expo, a huge convention held at Earl’s Court in the centre of London celebrating computer games. I am taking my camera and my dictation machine, the result of which is that I plan to report on the event on this very Blog at the end of each day. So, if you are interested in computer games news, or you are considering attending the event and want to know if it is worth it, “stay tuned”.

Thirdly, I have several exciting photoshoots that I have been planning, but I am keeping my ideas top secret 😉

So, in the coming weeks, expect this Blog to be very, very fruitful, but in the meanwhile, my most sincere apologies for the wait.

How To Train Your Dragon: The Game Xbox 360

Introduction
My second product review

Review

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON: THE GAME
my verdict on the game of the popular film

I went into this game expecting the best thing since sliced bread.

I am a huge fan of the film; I love the world, its characters, its adorable (and sometimes scary) dragons… That world takes me so far from mine that I forget, when I come back to reality, that I am not, in fact, a child, but an adult, and that a game designed for children may not necessarily be to my taste, though I want it to be…

– – – –

This game is, by no means, “bad”. I have played far worse, especially games adapted from other formats (comics, films etc). I do think, however, that it could have been so much better.

Though my expectations were high, making me almost certain to be disappointed, I honestly think even children would find this game difficult to tolerate. Children are far more intelligent than games developers often give them credit for, and this was clearly no exception.

– – – –

This game’s biggest fault is that, though the characters and dragons and setting are there, and the animation and gameplay itself is quite good, the established mythology of the film appears to have been completely disregarded. The dialogue seems to suggest that Vikings have been taming dragons for centuries, though it is well established in the titular film that Hiccup is the first of his people to ever accomplish the feat.

The basic concept says that “every year” tournaments are held between dragon tamers and their dragons, who fight each other for Viking glory. A plot that is, to be honest, an utter let down, considering the emotion and the depth of the film, and, as aforementioned, contradicts the established history. If you are not an established fan of the franchise, however, you will of course have no difficulties accepting the premise.

Another big problem is the repetitive gameplay and dialogue. You will find yourself walking back and forth from place to place, doing mundane, repetitious tasks in order to level up your dragon and advance the plot, and that the AI characters say the same three lines over and over, much, doubtless, to your annoyance. But, if you play this game in small segments, rather than long sittings, you will find that it maintains its quirky charm and fun-factor.

– – – –

Problems aside, I did very much enjoy training my dragon and fighting other characters in the various tournaments, and the cut scenes between did make me smile, even if not nearly as much as the film. The Arcade Mode, which allows you to fight off against your friends sharing your console, or against the computer AI, also allows for more replayability than you would normally expect from film tie-ins.

Adults who want to find that “first RPG” for their mini-geek will also enjoy the game dynamics, which require the player to complete various mini-games and quests in order to advance their dragon’s rank and gain new skills, very much in the style of the Elder Scrolls or Final Fantasy games, but on a much smaller scale. They might also find that they enjoy it themselves, as a light hearted “guilty pleasure”, though I recommend playing it in small quantities as it can be quite draining, with its repetition.

Gamerscore hoarders will also be very much be at home here, as many of the Achievements (or Trophies, whichever applies) require not so much effort, as time. Ten or twenty hours of playing through the campaign as either character, and many of them will occur through natural gameplay.

– – – –

In conclusion, this is a game that, though not really working with established continuity, lacking in the heart and depth that the film has, and a tad repetitive, is lighthearted fun that the whole family can enjoy together, or that the more “hardcore gamer” can enjoy as a guilty pleasure and a welcome break from the seriousness of their usual gaming taste.

“Give it a shot, why not?” very much applies here. It is by no means a waste of money nor time, but it is also not something that I would recommend rushing out to by and spend hours of enjoyment playing. I recommend this as a rental, or a “sale buy” for fans of the film, parents of young children, or for hardcore gamers looking for something more light hearted that can still give them a nice gamerscore boost.

Feedback
It is important that I receive feedback from my readers. I would truly appreciate any feedback at all that you can provide me. Posting comments of encouragement, or constructively critiquing my efforts. I really want to further myself as a writer and with your help I can.

Thank you.

Plans For The The Diamond Jubilee

As everyone is surely aware, tomorrow is the Diamond Jubilee of our British Queen, marking her sixty years of rule. There will be many picnics, parades, etc, and hopefully it will be a day to remember.

My initial instinct was to stay indoors and avoid the crowds and the noise, but the journalist in me has been screaming “No, it is history in the making! You must photograph it, you must write about it!” … Guess which one won 😉

So, tomorrow I shall be spending the day out-and-about, photographing any celebrations that I come by, taking notes, asking questions, etc, so that I might write an article about the day, contribute to my Photography Portfolio, etc.

In particular, I shall be spending the afternoon at the Folkestone Jubilee Airshow, which is, unitself, quite a historical event, as it is the first Air Show to be held within Folkestone in ten years!

If you live in or have access to Folkestone, I would highly recommend it, it looks to be quite spectacular 🙂

But, if you have other plans, be they lurking indoors avoiding as much of the celebrations as possible, having a perfectly normal day because you live in another country, or partaking in one of the many, many celebrations, do enjoy yourself all the same.

I look forward to sharing my photographs and report(/s) of my experience of the day with you all soon.

X-Men: Destiny Xbox 360

Introduction
This is my first ever product review. I hope you enjoy reading it more than I enjoyed playing the game 😉

Review

X-MEN: DESTINY
my verdict on Marvel’s newest X-Men computer game venture

I will be honest… I feel cheated.

There has been a lot of hype about this game, a lot of “name dropping” from the world of Marvel comics insisting this will be the best Marvel computer game ever produced because it was written by this big-name writer and because of all the freedom offered by the game’s sytem where you can “create your own character”, “choose your powers”, etc, but after only my first play-through of the game, I can tell you that all of this is far from true.

– – – –

First and foremost, I want to state that I am not a comic book fan. I have a lot of knowledge on the subject, but I have never actually enjoyed reading them.

Nevertheless I was excited to hear of Mike Carey’s involvement in the project. I had high hopes that he would be an asset to the game, and this was indeed the case. The plotline is intriguing, the four character choices are unique and interesting, the script is humorous and at times quite heart-warming, and there is a lot of “geek outs” for the established fan base, but the problem here is that no matter how good a writer, if the rest of the project is poor, their efforts bare no relevance. This is one of those cases.

– – – –

For something with such an intelligent, original premise, this game is certainly patronising in its gameplay. My personal favourite example being within the early tutorial section of the game when Emma Frost requests that the character “try jumping”, which, funnily enough, I am pretty sure any individual can do, no “trying” required. Another fine example is that the “Collectibles” that would, in other games, require a great deal of hunting to find and earn the usual Achievements on discovery of all of them, are, for the most part, practically impossible to miss. Considering the age rating, you would expect them to treat their players with more respect.

The gameplay itself is not much of a challenge, either. I played through on the easiest setting, and then on the hardest, and to be quite honest, I did not notice much of a difference until around two-thirds the way through the game, when suddenly it became redicilously difficult. I dispise games that have uneven difficulties like that, where you ease through them for so long and then spend hours on one part. There needs to be a balance, but the creators of this game do not seem to have even tried to within that regard. The constant “button bashing” gameplay and the amount of replays required in order to gain many of the Achivements also make this a chore to tolerate.

– – – –

Visually, there is not much to make this stand out from the crowd. In fact, given the impressive visuals from prior Marvel Comics game outings (mainly Spider-Man) and how breathtaking the competition is (DC’s Batman Akham games should not be underestimated…), I found this to be a disgrace. It does not seem like a “Next-Gen” game at all, rather something you would find at a second-hand store that was released back in the nineties.

The voice-acting is both a pleasure and a pain, with the inclusion of many voices that we know from other Marvel productions being a nice touch, but the fact the words being said are inconsistent with the subtitles provided makes you wonder what on earth is going on with the editing. In fact, most of the subtitles are better than what is actually being said, so clearly they missed a trick there.

The soundtrack leaves much to be desired as well. To be honest, I barely noticed it, and I cannot even remember it, which does not bode well.

– – – –

The “Some Destinies Are Chosen” tagline does, in its defense, do exactly what it says on the tin. There are four characters to play, and with each one you could easily play two or three times to experience different side-quests, watch different cut-scenes, etc. But, as aforementioned, you would have to have a lot of patience for the repetitive gameplay. It come down, again, to having a talented, but sadly wasted, writer.

The fact that you can essentially choose hundreds of combinations of powers from within the X-Universe is also very interesting, and contributes to the possible replayability, but be warned, no plot explanation is given, and for the comic book geeks or picky gamers such as myself out there, that will be quite an annoyance.

– – – –

Clearly not much money was wasted on the development of this first stand-alone X-Men game to have been released in nigh ten years, which is a real shame because it had so, so much potential and, thanks to the mostly negative critical and fan response, I doubt there will be another one any time soon.

So, in conclusion, if you have the time and the patience, and you are a fan of comic books, I would recommend you at least rent this for the plot and the fun of the choosing your own powers, or pick it up second hand, but hardcore gamers and those paying out the full price will be utterly disappointed.

Feedback
It is important that I receive feedback from my readers. I would truly appreciate any feedback at all that you can provide me. Posting comments of encouragement, or constructively critiquing my efforts. I really want to further myself as a writer and with your help I can.

Thank you.

Keeping Up Appearances

Introduction
It has been a couple of months since I published my last article, and a month since my last post, but I fell rather ill, and I apologise for that. I am still ill, but decided “enough is enough” and that I could not go another day without writing, and here is the result. I hope that you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it. Please feel free to provide feedback. Constructive critique is of course encouraged. Thank you.

Article

KEEPING UP APPEARANCES
why having a brilliantly successful television program is no excuse for poor production value

– – – –

I am disappointed. Genuinely disappointed by the fact that I can be watching a “kick ass” science fiction or fantasy show, perhaps a “Dramedy”, whatever it is that I am in the mood for at the time, and yet no matter what the studio, what the genre, or what the program is, as it grows, its budget increases, not, it would seem, so that it can be a better program overal, but so that there can be one or two amazing episodes, and the rest can be relatively standard. It seems that, the more popular the show is, the more it suffers from this affliction.

– – – –

Some of the most popular science fiction television programs ever produced have each had their fair share of “fillersodes”, “clipisodes”, and otherwise poor production value.

Doctor Who was once a program about travelling the universe, and in today’s “Nu Who” you will be lucky to even leave earth more than once or twice a season. Apparently the aliens would rather come to us. Sure, we have these amazing, big budget series openers and finales, but is it worth it if we have to live through episodes which are an insult to our intelligence, such as ‘Love & Monsters’, featuring a Blue Peter competition winning alien who “absorbed” people, full of toilet humour and having practically no screen time for The Doctor?

Stargate: SG1 has a seemedly ongoing joke where every season features a “clipisode”, an episode where the plot demands that clips from this and prior seasons be shown. It should be noted that Power Rangers does this very same thing. The plot is usually a good cover up for the need for clips, but is it really necessary?

Star Trek is another example. Pointless low budget episodes are abound, especially in experimental prequel series Star Trek: Enterprise.

Even the modern Battlestar Galactica, hailed by critics and fans as “perfect” suffered setbacks with episodes such as their Fight Club-style filler, ‘Unfinished Business’ where the characters face off in a boxing ring. It really upset the overal pace, although to be fair it did fill a lot of gaps in character development and the finale was clearly better for it.

– – – –

Low budget “fillersodes” filling the gap before the series finale are not always bad things, however. One fan told me “If done right they can bring something new to the table”. The best example that comes to mind is that Doctor Who also featured two episodes in the Tenth Doctor’s fourth series – ‘Midnight’ and ‘Turn Left’ – which were brilliant, edge-of-your-seat, yet clearly budgeted episodes.

So, why can all of these “fillersodes” not be “done right”? Or why not cut out these big budget, some may even say over-the-top finales and openers entirely, so that every episode can be just as good as the next? I understand all too well how visually breathtaking these can be and how, to be quite honest, I do look forward to them, but is it truly worth it if I have to sit through such rubbish in the process?

Really, do we need The Doctor encountering witches? Do we need the SG1 team sitting through a meeting – yes, an entire episode was dedicated to a meeting – discussing episodes that we have already seen? Do we need the scripted toilet humour, the poorly designed monsters, the fillers and the clips, even if it means having the so-called “epic” episodes?..

Some fans say yes, stating that it “give[s] them something crazy to do” with their big budgets, some say no, that it is “pure money saving and a waste of space”. It is clearly a matter of personal preference.

– – – –

I for one, though, feel as though this is a disease spreading across our television screens. Earlier seasons of most programs do not suffer it. They may not have these amazing, big budget finales or openers, but they do have good overal production value. Not one episode suffers from cheap jokes or poor effects or characters mysteriously disappearing because the budget meant they could not afford the actor for the entirety of the season.

And yet, as these “good overal” programs grow, so does their budget, and, in turn, the affliction hits them like the common cold, and I find myself weaping for their loss.

Merlin, for instance, was never a brilliant program, but it has always been quite enjoyable and I considered no particular episode to be “bad” as such. But, as the seasons went on, the budget rose, and I found that there were a lot of tightly budgeted episodes with practically no magic – and therefore no special effects – involved, so that they could do their big budget finales. I even turned off an episode ten minutes in that involved a creature causing general havok around the castle, because of its appalling use of toilet humour, how it belittled our beloved characters, and how downright insulting the plot was to my intelligence. And yet suddenly, come the season finale, it became clear why they suffered their viewers such an episode.

– – – –

Science fiction and fantasy television are not the only genres to suffer this. Even common household names such as Eastenders have their big-budget episodes with their car crashes, murders and weddings, which is (apparently) great viewing, but the fault here is the fact that many of the other episodes are drull, lacking in any of the drama that soap operas are renouned for because all of the budgeting for the talented writers, the “guest appearances”, the special effects, etc, went towards one or two episodes instead of being spread throughout all of them.

No channel, no genre, seems safe from this contagion.

– – – –

I understand that every program has a budget and that budget must be calculated with relation to what the writing entails – the people hired to work with each episode, the pay-grade of the stars, etc – but a loss of quality means a loss of viewers, it really is that simple, so why can the studios and channels not realise this and spread the budget evenly instead of wasting it? It feels as though they are a person with the funding for an entire wardrobe who decides they are going to “splash out” on one particular, more expensive item, and the rest of the wardrobe will suffer for that budget cut.

Why not follow by good example? Time Team, a popular, long-running Channel 4 documentary about hunting for history in people’s back gardens, decided to do some “Specials” in amungst the standard episodes in bigger places, such as the Cantenbury dig, which took them months, not days, to complete. Once the popularity of these Specials grew, the normal, lower budget episodes seemed sub-par, so they were cut completely. Now the program places its entire budget into big projects, and the viewing figures are far higher, because it is obvious that consistent quality sells better to the public. They decided to spread their budget over a few really brilliant episodes instead of dozens of “okay” episodes followed by one big-budget special, and it really, really works.

– – – –

In conclusion, enjoyable though these big-budget episodes may be, I feel as though the overal quality is far more important, and I am not alone. The general concensus amung fans, reflected in the viewing figures and internet chatter all show that the public are more inclined to stay with a program that is consistent with its quality than “tune-in” to one that will waste a large percentage of its budget purely for the visual spectacle of one or two episodes, and try to cheat them into watching poor production value for the rest of the series.

We, the viewing public, are not unintelligent. We know what we enjoy, and with the wide variety of programs available to us every day, do these studios and channels really want to take the chance of losing viewers for the poor quality episodes simply to increase figures for the ones that have the budget? With the advancement of “streaming” technology and all the different channels available it is so easy to lose us and never get us back.

Perhaps the industry aught to think about concentrating on overal quality if they want to keep those viewing figures, and in turn the money, rolling in.

Special Thanks
Many thanks to all of the people that provided me with their opinions and facts for this particular article. It is greatly appreciated.

Feedback
It is important that I receive feedback from my readers. I would truly appreciate any feedback at all that you can provide me. Posting comments of encouragement, or constructively critiquing my efforts. I really want to further myself as a writer and with your help I can.

Thank you.

Write What You Know

I have been scouring the internet looking for more “inspirational quotes” as I seem to get the most clicks onto my Blog for those and I think people really like them.

I found that the most common, famous quote for many writers who are trying to inspire fellow pen smiths appears to be

“Write what you know”

Many famous authors, poets, journalists, etc, have said this, and to a certain degree, I think it is really valuable advice. Sometimes it seems obvious that a writer would find it easiest to write about their life, their experiences, their opinions… but the fact is, “easiest” is not always best.

So, my “inspirational quote” for you today is not that of a famous writer, but that of my own, from me, aspiring writer, to you, my fellow aspiring writers, or even to those of you that are already professionals in the field.

“Write what you do not know”

Illisia Adams

“Why advise this?” you might be questioning me presently. I shall answer.

A good writer writes well when they are writing from their personal experiences and opinions (etc). A great writers writes from the experiences of others, from their imagination, from outside their comfort zone.

I think that this is especially important for journalists. I have read so many articles in the past where the writer is clearly of a certain opinion, writing about an event or a film or a lifestyle, etc, that is not to their taste, and although it is their professional requirement to be neutral, especially when they are an informative journalist (as opposed to a journalist who reviews films, for instance), many seem far too opinionated.

I have been writing a lot of articles about my opinion on certain topics, and as much as I feel this is my strongest writing, I have looked at my work and have decided (as I posted about recently) that I need to test myself, to stretch my experience and knowledge, to delve into more factual articles that require much research, quotes, etc. What good am I as a journalist if I cannot vary my writing for different topics and styles? Inside the press room, your Editor will give you a task, and you do it. You do not complain that it is not something that you are interested in, and the finished product should always be something that you can be proud of, that you can say you put all your heart into, even if it was difficult.

Even writers of fiction should heed my advice. C S Lewis, best known for his Narnia books, was also a writer of science fiction. Steven King, the best selling horror author in history, has also written some stunning thrillers which have been made into successful films. Yes, fantasy was Lewis’ strongest genre, and horror will always be King’s, but even they knew this…

“A good writer writes well when they write what they know… but a great writer writes well when they write what they don’t.”
Illisia Adams

Coming Soon…

I have been busy the last few days helping a friend, and during this period, I was not able to type, but gosh, did I click! My camera has been a busy girl, flashing some beautiful shots of nature. Nothing journalistic, of course, more just contributions to my more personal Portfolio, but it has been many weeks since I last took a snap, so I am quite please that I am “back in the game” of photography to say the least.

That excitement and happiness that I felt when I was behind that lens, I missed it very much. I have been sitting affront my computer screen for so long, typing away for hours on end about all manner of subjects, but there is just something more passionate and meaningful to capturing moments on film – allbeit digital.

I have decided that I am going to be looking for local events to attend and photograph, perhaps even report on, pairing my two passions together at last. Doing that would be a big step for me.

So, I am finishing (and Posting) the articles that I have so far on the film and television industry which are very much picture-less, but hopefully still an enjoyable read, and then I am going to try something more journalistic and factual, as apposed to opinion-based.

Wish me luck!