Defiance Xbox 360 Beta: The Follow-Up

Defiance-Syfy

I recently had the opportunity to Beta Test the brilliant “transmedia” Defiance game on my Xbox 360 console, weeks before its launch, and posted an indepthtual article and review about my experience which has been drawing in a lot of interest.

I received a thank you email (sent out to all participants) from Nathan Richardsson, Executive Producer of the game, with a few words about how the Beta test went, plans for the future of the game, etc, and I have decided to write a follow-up to share this information with you.

According to Nathan, the console version of the Beta test actually included a lot of bugs that had already been dealt with as a result of feedback from the PC release, atop which the feedback for the console Beta has been vast, so they claim that the final release will be much, much less faulty.

“Now we look forward to showing you the real, more polished game while we act on your feedback to deliver continuous updates that improves our obsession. That’s the beauty of a server-side game – constant updates that are fast like whoa.”

Even now, post-Beta, he included a link to continue to send feedback about our experiences. They really do seem to be working hard to make this game work.

“We look forward to living up to expectations and to delivering new missions, weapons, challenges and more. Free. Over and over again.”

Not only that, but the email was surprisingly humorous, personal, and geeky, as you can see from the quotes. He referred to himself as “proud member of the 150-person Defiance team” and spoke of the game-television hybrid as an “obsession”, which tells me that the creators are actually really nice people and fans of the genre, rather than just money-makers, who treat the viewers and gamers with respect.

watch first 14 minutes of defiance

Click to view the first fourteen minutes of the television series Pilot! (Geographical location restrictions may apply)

I am pleasantly surprised, and impressed.

I am really, really looking forward to getting my hands on the full version, which can be Pre-Ordered now for your platform of choice released on April 04th, and of course, to watching every episode of the coinciding television program, due to air on April 15th/16th (depending on location).

Remember, you can watch exclusive Behind-The-Scenes footage, trailers, clips and more from the show and game on the official YouTube Channel and the Videos section of the main website while you wait, and there is an exclusive, world premiere of the first fourteen minutes of the television Pilot available to watch as well.

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DEFIANCE: Xbox 360 Beta Game Review

Featured

Defiance-logo

Defiance is the future. It is a unique, groundbreaking concept; a television series with a computer game crossover that is a multi-platform Massive Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game that is not “based on” the series, but is directly effected by it, and vice versa.

Yes, you read me right. How you (and your fellow gamers) play the “MMO” effects the television series. This has never, ever been done before.

defiance-the-game-logo

Continue reading

How Uninspected!

After posting an article about An Untitled Web Series About A Space Traveler Who Can Also Travel Through Time only days before departing for the event, and scheduling it to be posted whilst I was away, I, rather coincidentally, found promotional postcards at the very event that I had left for, The Sci-Fi Weekender, which were apparently placed there by one of the actors visiting from the US as part of the line-up for the weekend.

My reaction? First and foremost, as Doctor Horrible of Doctor Horrible’s Sing Along Blog so brilliantly put it, “What a crazy, random happenstance!”. Secondly, how utterly fantastic! One of the UK’s largest conventions, and the word about Inspector Spacetime’s very own series is spreading.

What a treat!

nb: Are you a fan of the show? Please remember, there is still time (at the occasion of Blog Post publication) to donate money to help fund a second series. For more information, visit the Kickstarter crowd funding campaign.

‘Untitled Web Series About A Space Traveler Who Can Also Travel Through Time’ aka “Community’s Doctor Who Parody” Seeks Series Two Funding!

The 'Untitled Web Series' logo

Fans of television shows Doctor Who and slightly-more-obscure “geekiest sitcom of all time” (as proclaimed by fans and critics alike) Community may have heard of Inspector Spacetime, a parody character based on The Doctor who has had several appearances in the geek-themed sitcom.

But, for those not “in the know”, here is The Inspector’s first ever appearance…

The fans of Community absolutely adored it. It became an ongoing joke, with several more appearances. Even Karen Gillan, aka Amy Pond, Companion of Matt Smith’s Doctor, heard tell of the parody, and after hunting down the show, became a fully fledged Community fan, even posting Tweets and a YouTube video (seen below) asking that the show creators consider giving her a Special Guest Appearance.


So, Inspector Spacetime himself, Travis Richey, wrote scripts for a full series of six episodes, which he pitched to the people at NBC, but they did not want to make it, so he decided to Kickstart the series himself, essentially funded by the fans, for the fans. I was unfortunately unable to contribute funding because, alas, I only found out about the series a few days after the campaign was completed.

Since then, all six episodes have been created and are available to view online, along with Making Ofs and Behind The Scenes footage. The trailer for series one is below, to wet your appetite.

Fans cosplay with the 'Untitled Web Series' cast.

Fans cosplay with the ‘Untitled Web Series’ cast, found from the official FaceBook Page.

With a current (at time of article publication) view count total of 201,464 for the six episodes, making it an average of 33,577 views per episode, the series has met with very positive reviews from both fans and critics, resulting in convention appearances from the cast, fans cosplaying (left photograph) as The Inspector and his companion Piper, and a second Kickstarter Campaign to produce a further series.

Inspector Spacetime Kickstarter promo

So, watch the series to see what all the fuss is about, and, if you like what you see, put some money into making more!

Backers on the Kickstarter Campaign get some really nice “goodies”, depending on the amount they donate, including downloads of the official soundtrack and episodes, a Special Thank You in the credits, signed portraits from the cast, signed scripts, and even Producer credit if you have $5000 to spare!

I for one will be putting some money aside next pay-day for the cause, because I found the show to be really quite entertaining, and deserving of more internet airtime.

Note: All images were taken from the Untitled Web Series FaceBook Page.

Challenge. Accepted.

Quote

“Nothing worth anything in life is ever easy”

This is something that I often say to people, and it defines the very principle by which I live my life. Life is the most worthwhile thing in the world, and is therefore the most difficult.

As I have posted about recently in my article about New Year’s Resolutions, I have suffered many personal issues this past year that have really pushed me from my path of becoming a professional journalist and photographer. Because, life is not easy.

Barney Stinson quote, How I Met Your Mother

“When I get sad, I stop being sad and be awesome instead. True story” – Barney Stinson, How I Met Your Mother

I have made it very clear to myself, my friends, my family, and my readers, that this year I have every intention of finding a balance between my personal and professional life, and earning money from my photography and journalism.

It is not going to be easy, at times it will be darned hard, but it is going to be really worthwhile. So, as Barney Stinson of the How I Met Your Mother television series has said many, many times…

“Challenge Accepted!”

I am breaking down my target into short-term, more achievable goals

  • Advertise my services
  • Gain 200 Likes on my FaceBook Page
  • Update website to have price list, references, etc, to encourage potential paid work
  • Send selection of works from photography and journalistic Portfolios to magazines and newspapers for consideration of publication
  • Brainstorm ideas and write enough “short and sweet” articles to set up the Blog to publish one every week for two months. This will develop my ability to write shorter articles and within a time limit.
  • Type up the interviews from Euro Gamer Expo 2012 and publish them
  • etc, etc, etc – more targets on the way soon!

I shall be posting updates on my progress, which you can follow in my Personal Progress Blog category, Subscribe to my updates with the ‘Stay Informed’ button on my starting page, ‘Follow’ me on my Twitter, or ‘Like’ my Fan Page on FaceBook.

If you have any comments or suggestions to help my in my task, I encourage you to Comment or Message me.

Image credit: Offset-Zero of deviantART

Reviews On The Way

Just a quick update.

I have started renting games for the Xbox 360 now, so I can review more efficiently, it gives me a chance to play through newer releases without costing me a fortune, and older releases without having to hunt them down. I am also using video streaming services so I can review more films and television. So, I am going to make a point of reviewing at least one film/book/television/game/etc each week, to give my Blog a quick refresher between articles and photography.

Rentals I currently have are

  • How To Train Your Dragon: The Game
  • Spider-Man: Friend Or Foe
  • Lord Of The Rings: War In The North
  • Dragon’s Dogma

Television and films I shall be watching are

  • Disney’s John Carter
  • No Ordinary Family
  • The Nine Lives Of Chloe King
  • The Woman In Black (both versions, I want to do a comparative review)

And lots more in the coming months (as and when they are released of course), including Xbox Live Arcade releases, and PC games…

I am also working on setting up a website to showcase my photography Portfolio, but in the meanwhile, you can find many examples on my FaceBook Profile here in the Photos section.

So, keep watching this space! 😉

Keeping Up Appearances

Introduction
It has been a couple of months since I published my last article, and a month since my last post, but I fell rather ill, and I apologise for that. I am still ill, but decided “enough is enough” and that I could not go another day without writing, and here is the result. I hope that you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it. Please feel free to provide feedback. Constructive critique is of course encouraged. Thank you.

Article

KEEPING UP APPEARANCES
why having a brilliantly successful television program is no excuse for poor production value

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I am disappointed. Genuinely disappointed by the fact that I can be watching a “kick ass” science fiction or fantasy show, perhaps a “Dramedy”, whatever it is that I am in the mood for at the time, and yet no matter what the studio, what the genre, or what the program is, as it grows, its budget increases, not, it would seem, so that it can be a better program overal, but so that there can be one or two amazing episodes, and the rest can be relatively standard. It seems that, the more popular the show is, the more it suffers from this affliction.

– – – –

Some of the most popular science fiction television programs ever produced have each had their fair share of “fillersodes”, “clipisodes”, and otherwise poor production value.

Doctor Who was once a program about travelling the universe, and in today’s “Nu Who” you will be lucky to even leave earth more than once or twice a season. Apparently the aliens would rather come to us. Sure, we have these amazing, big budget series openers and finales, but is it worth it if we have to live through episodes which are an insult to our intelligence, such as ‘Love & Monsters’, featuring a Blue Peter competition winning alien who “absorbed” people, full of toilet humour and having practically no screen time for The Doctor?

Stargate: SG1 has a seemedly ongoing joke where every season features a “clipisode”, an episode where the plot demands that clips from this and prior seasons be shown. It should be noted that Power Rangers does this very same thing. The plot is usually a good cover up for the need for clips, but is it really necessary?

Star Trek is another example. Pointless low budget episodes are abound, especially in experimental prequel series Star Trek: Enterprise.

Even the modern Battlestar Galactica, hailed by critics and fans as “perfect” suffered setbacks with episodes such as their Fight Club-style filler, ‘Unfinished Business’ where the characters face off in a boxing ring. It really upset the overal pace, although to be fair it did fill a lot of gaps in character development and the finale was clearly better for it.

– – – –

Low budget “fillersodes” filling the gap before the series finale are not always bad things, however. One fan told me “If done right they can bring something new to the table”. The best example that comes to mind is that Doctor Who also featured two episodes in the Tenth Doctor’s fourth series – ‘Midnight’ and ‘Turn Left’ – which were brilliant, edge-of-your-seat, yet clearly budgeted episodes.

So, why can all of these “fillersodes” not be “done right”? Or why not cut out these big budget, some may even say over-the-top finales and openers entirely, so that every episode can be just as good as the next? I understand all too well how visually breathtaking these can be and how, to be quite honest, I do look forward to them, but is it truly worth it if I have to sit through such rubbish in the process?

Really, do we need The Doctor encountering witches? Do we need the SG1 team sitting through a meeting – yes, an entire episode was dedicated to a meeting – discussing episodes that we have already seen? Do we need the scripted toilet humour, the poorly designed monsters, the fillers and the clips, even if it means having the so-called “epic” episodes?..

Some fans say yes, stating that it “give[s] them something crazy to do” with their big budgets, some say no, that it is “pure money saving and a waste of space”. It is clearly a matter of personal preference.

– – – –

I for one, though, feel as though this is a disease spreading across our television screens. Earlier seasons of most programs do not suffer it. They may not have these amazing, big budget finales or openers, but they do have good overal production value. Not one episode suffers from cheap jokes or poor effects or characters mysteriously disappearing because the budget meant they could not afford the actor for the entirety of the season.

And yet, as these “good overal” programs grow, so does their budget, and, in turn, the affliction hits them like the common cold, and I find myself weaping for their loss.

Merlin, for instance, was never a brilliant program, but it has always been quite enjoyable and I considered no particular episode to be “bad” as such. But, as the seasons went on, the budget rose, and I found that there were a lot of tightly budgeted episodes with practically no magic – and therefore no special effects – involved, so that they could do their big budget finales. I even turned off an episode ten minutes in that involved a creature causing general havok around the castle, because of its appalling use of toilet humour, how it belittled our beloved characters, and how downright insulting the plot was to my intelligence. And yet suddenly, come the season finale, it became clear why they suffered their viewers such an episode.

– – – –

Science fiction and fantasy television are not the only genres to suffer this. Even common household names such as Eastenders have their big-budget episodes with their car crashes, murders and weddings, which is (apparently) great viewing, but the fault here is the fact that many of the other episodes are drull, lacking in any of the drama that soap operas are renouned for because all of the budgeting for the talented writers, the “guest appearances”, the special effects, etc, went towards one or two episodes instead of being spread throughout all of them.

No channel, no genre, seems safe from this contagion.

– – – –

I understand that every program has a budget and that budget must be calculated with relation to what the writing entails – the people hired to work with each episode, the pay-grade of the stars, etc – but a loss of quality means a loss of viewers, it really is that simple, so why can the studios and channels not realise this and spread the budget evenly instead of wasting it? It feels as though they are a person with the funding for an entire wardrobe who decides they are going to “splash out” on one particular, more expensive item, and the rest of the wardrobe will suffer for that budget cut.

Why not follow by good example? Time Team, a popular, long-running Channel 4 documentary about hunting for history in people’s back gardens, decided to do some “Specials” in amungst the standard episodes in bigger places, such as the Cantenbury dig, which took them months, not days, to complete. Once the popularity of these Specials grew, the normal, lower budget episodes seemed sub-par, so they were cut completely. Now the program places its entire budget into big projects, and the viewing figures are far higher, because it is obvious that consistent quality sells better to the public. They decided to spread their budget over a few really brilliant episodes instead of dozens of “okay” episodes followed by one big-budget special, and it really, really works.

– – – –

In conclusion, enjoyable though these big-budget episodes may be, I feel as though the overal quality is far more important, and I am not alone. The general concensus amung fans, reflected in the viewing figures and internet chatter all show that the public are more inclined to stay with a program that is consistent with its quality than “tune-in” to one that will waste a large percentage of its budget purely for the visual spectacle of one or two episodes, and try to cheat them into watching poor production value for the rest of the series.

We, the viewing public, are not unintelligent. We know what we enjoy, and with the wide variety of programs available to us every day, do these studios and channels really want to take the chance of losing viewers for the poor quality episodes simply to increase figures for the ones that have the budget? With the advancement of “streaming” technology and all the different channels available it is so easy to lose us and never get us back.

Perhaps the industry aught to think about concentrating on overal quality if they want to keep those viewing figures, and in turn the money, rolling in.

Special Thanks
Many thanks to all of the people that provided me with their opinions and facts for this particular article. It is greatly appreciated.

Feedback
It is important that I receive feedback from my readers. I would truly appreciate any feedback at all that you can provide me. Posting comments of encouragement, or constructively critiquing my efforts. I really want to further myself as a writer and with your help I can.

Thank you.